JFK (1991) – Oliver Stone (Eric Norcross)

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JFK (1991) – Oliver Stone (Eric Norcross).

Although the themes of this movie are incredibly sinister, it’s an absolute must-see for any film aficionado and a must-study for any student of the medium. Regardless of your personal politics or opinion on the real world event, the film is an amazing achievement of nearly every aspect of the filmmaking craft. Anytime I get around to watching JFK, I tend to develop a sympathy for the filmmaker because of the dark place that working on this film must have sent him. This is not easy material to handle, not for anyone, and for achieving what he did with this project, I kindly ask that all of you have an open and appreciative mind when indulging in it. This is a work that deserves our utmost respect, from a man of great character and an impressive catalog of work to boot. [read more at A World of Film

 

Box Head Revolution

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BOX HEAD REVOLUTION is an avant-garde science fiction film that I had the pleasure of seeing recently. Largely shot in a Hollywood back alley, this experimental endeavor peaked my curiosity when it was given to me in 2012 during a visit to Los Angeles. I haven’t had a chance to check it out until recently. Any aficionado of avant-garde cinema should give Box Head Revolution a viewing.

In 1973 The US launches the space probe Voyager into space.

 

Placed upon the space probe is a golden record: SOUNDS OF PLANET EARTH.

 

The record is discovered by an alien race. The must incites a revolution.

A Box Head Revolution.

 

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Box Head Revolution was directed by Mark Christensen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Caroline of Virginia at Phnom Penh 2014

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Caroline of Virginia has been officially announced as an official selection of the 2014 Phnom Penh International Film Festival. This is a landmark event for me as a filmmaker as it is the first time my work will be seen outside of North America. I’m happy it was this particular film to make such an important achievement as it was the first film I made to get into a film festival to begin with and to be recognized with an award. It makes sense that it would continue to further my accolades.

Although I know the festival will be in September, I have not yet received the screening schedule so I do not know the exact date that COV will screen. I’m to understand the staffers there are working really hard on getting the scheduled locked and live, so stay tuned!

Please check out the film’s listing on the festival website at: http://www.ppiff.com/2014/caroline-of-virginia/ and connect with them on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/PhnomPenhIFF

COV-Still-BUS-STOP COV-Still-FINAL-SHOTWatch the production trailer on the festival’s YouTube Channel:

 

It Happened One Night at A World of Film

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A new article I wrote for A World of Film, this time I tackle the Frank Capra classic “It Happened One Night” – among the earliest of “road trip” movies.

[reblogged from A World of Film]

… The atmosphere on set was tense as Gable and Colbert disapproved of the material, citing the script aslow quality. It is purported that when Gable first arrived to set, he told Capra, “Let’s get this over with”, making it clear how unhappy he was to have been loaned out for this “inferior” project. Gable and Colbert took a liking to one another through their common dissatisfaction with the script and only lightened after Capra suggested that Gable play occasional pranks on her.

Although she got along well with Gable, Colbert continued to demonstrate her displeasure while on set. She is said to have had many tantrums, largely motivated by her deep seeded hatred towards Capra. She balked at the idea of hiking up her skirt to entice passing drivers to give her a ride, citing that it was “beneath her”. Capra responded by introducing Colbert to her double, a chorus girl. Upon seeing her legs, a disgruntled Colbert changed her mind and agreed to do the scene without a double. Knowing that Colbert was perfect for the part, Capra took it all in stride, believing that the headache would pay off in the long run…. (read more at A World of Film)

[reblogged from A World of Film]

 

 

An Introduction To OBJECTS

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More info:

Crowd Funding Video for OBJECTS, a new feature indie film I plan on shooting in October 2014. Please be a gem and donate and spread the word about this film and the funding campaign. Check out the links below for deets.

IndieGoGo Funding: igg.me/at/objectsmovie
Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/objectsmovie

Eric Norcross: http://www.EricNorcross.com / http://www.NorcrossMedia.com

Also check out our cast:

Joshua: http://www.JoshuaScottGriffith.com
Mary Ashley: http://www.imdb.com/name/nm5385559/

Film Crash Series Reboots With NYC Event

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[reblogged from Renegade Cinema]

In one of the biggest festival reboots in the history of independent cinema, the Film Crash Series is returning to the indie film scene with an all new screening event to take place in Brooklyn, New York in September. Reworked as an annual film festival that will showcase original and unusual films, the programming staff will select one feature and five shorts, to screen in one evening. In addition to participating in an incredible networking opportunity, awards and prizes will be presented to select filmmakers, recognizing achievements in feature film directing, short film production, student and new media projects.

Past Tix

Founded by filmmakers Matt Harrison, Scott Saunders and Karl Nussbaum, the series was born out of the creative tempest of Manhattan’s East Village and Lower East Side during the Roaring 80′s and early 90′s. Known for creating a vibrant gathering place for a forever burgeoning independent film community, Film Crash grew and eventually broke free of its downtown roots and the event ventured abroad. Returning to NYC after many years on hiatus, I am looking forward to seeing the series shake up the indie film community as it did when it originally launched.

Filmmakers still have an opportunity to get in on the action. For submission and deadline information, please visit:  www.filmfreeway.com/festival/FilmCrash

Filmmakers and film buffs far and wide should check out Film Crash on Facebook: www.facebook.com/filmcrashfestival

[reblogged from Renegade Cinema]

 

 

Rhythm Thief Cast & Crew Reunite

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[Reblogged from my article at Renegade Cinema]

This past evening I had the pleasure of attending a screening of the 1994 indie film Rhythm Thief, which as some of you might remember, I previously wrote about in an article calling on Criterion to pick the movie up for distribution. There is something about this film that has mystified me since I first saw it and even though I have had multiple opportunities to sit down with filmmaker Matt Harrison to discuss his work, it was starting to sink in that no amount of Q&A’ing was going to help me figure out what was going on with this movie.

Tonight, I’ve made some progress. The film screened as part of the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s “Cinématek Overdue” series. Along with a screening of an actual 35mm print (which I rarely see these days), the event included a wonderfully detailed and enthusiastic Q&A with Harrison and his cast and crew, including actors Jason Andrews, Kevin Corrigan and Kimberly Flynn.

Aside from the usual battle stories which I had already been familiar with, one of the key components I discovered that makes this film special is the obvious rapport the participants have with one-another. It’s clear to me now that Rhythm Thief works because it is a film made out of love, not just love for the craft, but love between the people involved and that love, which has lasted two decades, is exactly what has been translated onto the screen. This is an element that is so important to the creative process, but is often overlooked by young indie filmmakers today, many of whom would easily sacrifice a friendship or two in exchange for time on a Red Epic.

Experimental filmmaker Jonas Mekas wrote in his Anti-100 Years Manifesto, “The real history of cinema is invisible history: history of friends getting together, doing the thing they love.” I’ve used this quote before and will again because it’s important and absolutely true. Today I witnessed that same love,  between all of the people involved in the making of this 90’s classic and I realize too that I can see that love come alive every time I take a gander at the work they all created together. Thankfully, I have taken a major leap forward in demystifying this amazing work.

Thanks for putting up with my romanticism.

-E

Rhythm Thief is available for streaming on YouTube, Amazon and on DVD through Netflix and Kino.

[Reblogged from my article at Renegade Cinema]